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wetheurban:

ART: The Present by Jon Jacobsen

Today we’re happy to bring you this beautiful series of cinemagraphs by Chile-based photographer and digital artist Jon Jacobsen. The Present is one of his latest works, a collection of animated images inspired in the present and how we feel it with our senses.

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Those messages were really old and Justin got mad because I didn’t add the fact that I have a boyfriend. He loves me. 

Anonymous
asks:
Will you marry my?

I assume you meant “me” and I don’t believe in marriage. Sorry. 

Anonymous
asks:
do you have to put on the red light?

I day dream about putting on the red light, wearing a skanky dress and walking the streets for money but then I remember I have it so easy no matter how much I complain. So, no I don’t have to put on the red light. 

nativeamericannews:

Fight the War! 13-Year-Old Calls on His Generation to Save the World
We live in a world controlled by money, greed and power.A world where every single decision that is made determines the kind of world future generations are going to inherit from us. A world built off of the lie that the Earth is a resource for our taking. A world built off a fragile mindset that says we are determined by our wealth, our social class and the amount of power we have.

nativeamericannews:

Fight the War! 13-Year-Old Calls on His Generation to Save the World

We live in a world controlled by money, greed and power.
A world where every single decision that is made determines the kind of world future generations are going to inherit from us. A world built off of the lie that the Earth is a resource for our taking. A world built off a fragile mindset that says we are determined by our wealth, our social class and the amount of power we have.



wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Russian Photographer’s Girlfriend Continues to Lead Him Around the World

Calling this ongoing photo-series simply ‘awesome’ would be the understatement of a lifetime! This, hands down, has to be one of the most dedicated and beautiful series from a photographer we’ve seen in ages.

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leighlittlefield:

sialand:

winterwhiskers:

cobscookbay:

catsbeaversandducks:

Gift Ideas For Cat Lovers

Links and more ideas HERE - Via Bored Panda 

GIVE ME ALL OF THIS.

ALL OF THEM.

Buy me it all and I’ll be yours furefur

No but really, I want a cat for Christmas

I want!
the-absolute-funniest-posts:

funniestpicturesdaily:

Went to go grab a beer, came back to this… Majestic as fuck.

the-absolute-funniest-posts:

funniestpicturesdaily:

Went to go grab a beer, came back to this… Majestic as fuck.

fimbrethil:

Read about photographer Sanaa Hamid here and found her project on cultural appropriation. In the project, Hamid takes photos of two people: one whose culture is appropriated and one who appropriates the culture. She maintains a neutral stance so as to generate discussion.
For me, I thought this photo was particularly interesting because of what the person says. They say, "I think the cross has lost a lot of its religious meaning so I am happy to wear it without feeling like I am mocking Christianity." This is interesting because, it seems clear to me, that appropriating such symbols (as this person does) is exactly what allows for the idea that “the cross has lost a lot of its religious meaning.” Those for who the cross does have meaning have their voices lost to those who wear the cross without meaning. 
This is true of all the examples brought up in Hamid’s project. The articles which are appropriated are actively losing meaning in a wider global context because of cultural appropriation. That is harmful and quite potentially dangerous. 
I also think it’s very important to note that nearly all of those who have their culture appropriated in this project are poc. Whereas all of the people doing the appropriating are white. It really speaks to how white people need to be more cognizant of what they do when it comes to interacting with and respecting other cultures, and how we must be concerned with how our interaction may impact the cultures we supposedly admire and/or respect. 

fimbrethil:

Read about photographer Sanaa Hamid here and found her project on cultural appropriation. In the project, Hamid takes photos of two people: one whose culture is appropriated and one who appropriates the culture. She maintains a neutral stance so as to generate discussion.

For me, I thought this photo was particularly interesting because of what the person says. They say, "I think the cross has lost a lot of its religious meaning so I am happy to wear it without feeling like I am mocking Christianity." This is interesting because, it seems clear to me, that appropriating such symbols (as this person does) is exactly what allows for the idea that “the cross has lost a lot of its religious meaning.” Those for who the cross does have meaning have their voices lost to those who wear the cross without meaning. 

This is true of all the examples brought up in Hamid’s project. The articles which are appropriated are actively losing meaning in a wider global context because of cultural appropriation. That is harmful and quite potentially dangerous. 

I also think it’s very important to note that nearly all of those who have their culture appropriated in this project are poc. Whereas all of the people doing the appropriating are white. It really speaks to how white people need to be more cognizant of what they do when it comes to interacting with and respecting other cultures, and how we must be concerned with how our interaction may impact the cultures we supposedly admire and/or respect. 

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Falling Garden by Gerda Steiner & Jorg Lenzlinger

Isn’t this peaceful? A beautiful delicate garden hanging from the ceiling of an even more beautiful 17th century church in Venice? A dream world we wish we could live in forever!

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explore-blog:

The Smithsonian curates the best science GIFs of the year – pictured above, a thought moving through a fish brain. Pair with the best science books of the year.

explore-blog:

The Smithsonian curates the best science GIFs of the year – pictured above, a thought moving through a fish brain. Pair with the best science books of the year.